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September 30 is Truth & Reconciliation Day & Orange Shirt Day – what does it mean?

September 30 is Truth & Reconciliation Day & Orange Shirt Day – what does it mean?

September 21, 2021

Why do we have a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation?

In order to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of Canadian reconciliation, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission made the following Call to Action: 

#80. We call upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, to establish, as a statutory holiday, a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation to honour survivors, their families, and communities, and ensure that public commemoration of the history and legacy of residential schools remains a vital component of the reconciliation process.

Why does the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Day fall on September 30, 2021?

September 30 was chosen to coincide with Orange Shirt Day. The date of September 30 was chosen for Orange Shirt Day because it is the time of year in which children were taken from their homes to residential schools, and because it is an opportunity to set the stage for anti-racism and anti-bullying policies for the coming school year.

Is the National Day for Truth and Reconciliation Day a statutory holiday?

The federal government passed a law in August to designate September 30 as a National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, to commemorate the tragic legacy of residential schools in Canada. But the federal government only has the authority to make it a holiday for federal government employees and people who work in federally regulated industries.

British Columbia has also recognized the day as a statutory holiday for provincial government offices, universities and schools.



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Last modified: Wednesday 03-Apr-24 12:36:29 PDT